How Facebook Helped Flood Victims in Pakistan.


[tweetmeme source=”DontBanFacebook” only_single=false]

Pakistan has been struck by the worst flooding in its history in late July 2010. The devastating floods have affected around 20 million ( 6 million are children ) people and killed 1500, but UN officials suggested the death tolls could prove to be higher.

UN spokesperson Maurizio Giuliano said:
” This disaster is worse than the Southeast Asia Tsunami, the 2005 Pakistan earthquake and the Haiti earthquake. ”

Social Media earned a spot alongside relief planner and traditional news media. The user-generated messages supported organizations on a second by second basis. Social Media has become the medium in which every body spread the word.

The most important part of social media impact is, it makes people (like us) feel like they are empowered enough to make a difference. Real-time communication platforms like Twitter and Facebook helped spread the word about what’s happening within and how one can help.

Qalandar Memon, a volunteer, respond to the question how social media is helping his organization to help floods victims:

 “Yes it is useful. It allows me to get the message to people and keep them updated. This has helped increase donations and also transparency. So people on my Facebook who I have not met for many years have being sending money. While, they can also keep apace with what his happening through my updates.”

NPOs from Pakistan and around the world utilized social media especially Facebook and Twitter to raise fund for the victims. In fact some good people from Pakistan are still working for victims and using Facebook as their primary communication tool.

Another small community of individual raised 2 Millions for the victims.

You don’t need to be super rich to give a helping hand especially in a crisis such as this. Tweets & status updates of NPOs are being reshared by their followers, motivating masses across the world to donate for relief.

Facebook users in Pakistan were more informed about flood disaster and relief than others. Millions of pictures and videos of victims and affected areas were being shared.

People are showing that we can make a genuine positive impact on our world in the age of Facebook and social media.

It is true that Facebook isn’t going to heal the people of Pakistan alone. It is just a collection of tools, it’s up to us the people to make the real impact on our world. And believe us banning will not bring a harmony to Islam, Pakistan or You. When whole world is moving forward, why the hell we do not grow up, why the hell we are being run by few illiterate minds who don’t want to see us empowered, well-informed.

It is your turn now, speak up, spread the word. Go make some noise for good.
Have your say in comments.

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “How Facebook Helped Flood Victims in Pakistan.

  1. In Honor of Mothers & Children: Tweet for Hunger and Education

    http://susanmariepr.blogspot.com/2011/05/in-honor-of-mothers-children-tweet-for.html

    In honor of my Mother, Mary, as a UN Volunteer and blogger for hunger through WFP; I decided along with CEO and founder of PYA, Syed Ali Abbas Zaidi, to donate towards the renovation and rebuilding of schools in Pakistan by asking people to tweet: #pkfloods @ThinkTwiceRadio #MothersDay @P_Y_A

    *For every single tweet per account, up to 1,000 tweets, I will donate to Pakistan Youth Alliance towards cost of renovation of elementary schools drastically damaged by the 2010 flooding in Pakistan.

    Pakistan Youth Alliance [PYA], one of the forerunners of youth organizations in Pakistan, are in the process of giving education back to children who currently do not have schools to attend.

    PYA, created and based in Pakistan in 2007, with chapters in Canada, KSA, and the UK, educates and empowers youth in order to cause awareness through action. Their focus is on societal issues that need to be understood, supported and altered in order to create a tolerable and progressive society.

    Syed Ali Abbas Zaidi, CEO of PYA, along with co-founder, Maryam Kanwer, created this organization in 2007. In 2011, PYA has grown into an international movement recognized by the UN in NYC.

    I met them on Facebook. Right now, I have over 20 hours of messages to go through from the entire world who have and are helping the people of Pakistan. Without social media, this would be impossible.

  2. Pingback: Pakistan is Facebook 2nd Fastest Growing Country in Middle East | Don't Ban Facebook in Pakistan

  3. Pingback: Assholes Are Everywhere; French Ban Word ‘Facebook’ and ‘Twitter’ on TV and Radio | Don't Ban Facebook in Pakistan

  4. There’s something id like to point out here. Facebook is definitely a useful tool for society and has great potential for good. Its a service that provides a platform for free expression. As such it also has a responsible role to play in monitoring the content that it hosts. In my view freedom of expression is not an absolute concept…The problem is that people ignore the complexities of freedom of expression. Its not as simple as ‘you can say anything you want’. There is a distinction between criticism and hate mongering yet both are forms of expression. The latter should not be deemed acceptable under the false guise of freedom of expression. Agreed its a nuisance to clean up the scores of hateful pages out there but the least id expect of facebook as a neutral and socially conscious moderator is to condemn them. By not doing so, not only does facebook fail in its role as moderator but also take a hostile stance towards its musilm users. And those muslim users need to stop being so apologetic about demanding their rights

  5. Pingback: Twitter Is Blocked In Pakistan | Waqas Ali

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s